Summary: In 2010 the Rockefeller Foundation published 4 scenarios for the development, i.e. chaos, of the world in the period 2010-2030. Although it is pointed out, that the report is guesswork it is very interesting reading to see how the Illuminati planning the development of the world towards chaos see our future.

In the report, we find all the well-known words and ideas which on this blog have been repeated endlessly: central global government, nation states losing power and control of their economies, loss of welfare states, UN took new levels of authority, regionalisation, greener world, more poverty, better infrastructure, order out of NWO-created chaos, predetermined, top-down authoritarian government with increasing citizen pushback, a more controlled world willingly accepted by citizens in exchange for greater safety, corporations having more and more power, science serving money, civil unrest due to clashes between individual and government interests, unlimited growth with manmade climate change disasters, rising sea level, CO2–cap-and trade trading, coastal megacities (Agenda 21), more GMO food,  2010–2020 the doom decade with break-up of alliances and proxy wars, resource and food scarcities, increasing crime, resurgence of feudalism, hostile divisions of countries along ethnic lines, the distinction between developed and developing countries disappeared, immigrants unwanted – no jobs for them, so that they would return to their countries of origin.  This is of course very naïve: Social refugees will not return or be allowed to return by the also predicted world government behind the developing chaos. But worst of all: it was often a retreat to family ties, religious beliefs, or even national allegiance, thus doing Adam Weishaupt´s/Mayer Rothschild´s NWO 6-point program – which had been so successful - in.

However, there are some very worrisome predictions for the year 2012: 13.000 to be bombed to death at the London Olympic Games - and a very deadly flu epidemic killing 8 Mio. people in 2012. If such events do take place there will be no doubt as to who planned them.

By 2016, the global coordination and interconnectedness that had marked the post-Berlin Wall world was tenuous at best. With government power weakened, order rapidly disintegrating, and safety nets evaporating, violence and crime grew more rampant.
Countries with ethnic, religious, or class divisions saw especially sharp spikes in hostility. Meanwhile, overtaxed militaries and police forces could do little to stop growing communities of criminals and terrorists from gaining power.

Without the ability to boost economic activity, many countries saw their debts deepen and civil unrest climb. The United States, too, lost much of its presence and credibility on the international stage due to deepening debt, debilitated markets, and a distracted government. This, in turn,
led to the fracturing or decoupling of many international collaborations started by or reliant on the U.S.’s continued strength. Also in trouble was China, where social stability grew more precarious. Indeed, nearly all foreign investment in Africa — as well as formal, institutional flows of aid and other support for the poorest countries — was cut back.

Those who couldn’t buy their way out of chaos — which was most people — retreated to whatever “safety” they could find. With opportunity frozen and global mobility at a near standstill — no place wanted more people, especially not more poor people -trust was afforded to those who guaranteed safety and survival — whether it was a warlord, an evangelical preacher, or a mother. By 2030, the distinction between “developed” and “developing” nations no longer seemed particularly descriptive or relevant.

The decade 2010-2020 is called the Doom decade: criminality, proxy wars, parents omit to have their children vaccinated - so children die like flies! Global food shortage, break up of alliances, violence, order disintegrating. Everybody produces GMO foods in his backyard! The philantropic corporations come to the rescue of the poor along with their faithful hirelings, the NGOs.

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Habakkuk 2:12 Woe to him that buildeth a town with blood, and stablisheth a city by iniquity!
13 … that the people shall labour in the very fire, and the people shall weary themselves for very vanity? 16 Thou art filled with shame for glory..

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CNBC admits that we are all slaves to Rothschild´s central banks. Rothschild´s right arm is Rockefeller.

When The Rockefeller Foundation, the world´s foremost advocate of New World Order and eugenics and population control, Rothschild´s strongest arm behind the US Federal Reserve and the US Council on Foreign Relations, makes a prognosis for the near future there is every reason to be attentive. In 2010, The Rockefeller Foundation – so intricately associated with the supplier of poisonous GMO food for the world, the Monsanto/US Dept. of Agriculture Ltd. issued a paper for world development/chaos of the the period of 2010–2030, called “Scenarios for the Future of Technology and International Development.

Big-ben-disasterIn it we find all the well-known words and ideas which on this blog have been repeated endlessly: central global government, nation states losing power and control of their economies, loss of welfare states, UN took new levels of authority, regionalisation greener world, more poverty, better infrastructure  Order out of chaos from NWO-created chaos, predetermined, top-down authoritarian government with increasing citizen pushback, (planned) pandemic 2012 killing millions and economy,  a more controlled world willingly accepted by citizens in exchange for greater safety, corporations having more and more power, science serving money, civil unrest deue to clashes between individual and government interests, unlimited growth with manmade climate change disasters, rising sea level, CO2–cap-and trade trading, coastal megacities (Agenda 21), more GMO food,  2010–2020 the doom decade with break-up of alliances and proxy wars, resource and food scarcities , increasing crime, resurgence of feudalism, hostile divisions of countries along ethnic lines, the distinction between developed and developing countries disappeared, immigrants unwanted – no jobs for them, so that they would return to their countries of origin. And worst of all: it was often a retreat to family ties, religious beliefs, or even national allegiance.

But ut most eery: The prognosis forecasts that 13.000 people will be killed by bombing of the London summer Olympics and here and a very virulent pandemic killing 8 million and affecting 20% of the world population as well as world economy. This means an early test of the credibility of the scenarios – and would prove that such scenarios are planned by the Illuminati.

Sustainability is rooted in the sick imagination of Rockefeller´s Club of Rome, which was officially born at Rockefeller´s Villa Serbelloni at Bellagio, Italy, in 1965. However, it existed already in 1953 – before the Bilderberg Club – with this bunch of globalists incl. David Rockefeller.

The excerpt below contains nothing surprising – but it does confirm the eery future for the world, planned by them on a bunch of lies like the global warming scam and the blessing of GMO food.  For comments on this, see Adrian Salbucchi.

Rockefeller-future-scenario2

It is important to realize that many such papers have been eerily accurate in the past and thus must be considered when such events unfold in the near future. The scenarios may also be seen as the wishful thinking of the globocrats.

The president of the Rockefeller, Judith Rodin, thanks i.a. Peter Schwarz of the Global Business Network for his role in the scenario. Peter Schwarz writes: “Throughout my 40-plus-year career as a scenario planner, I have worked with many of the world’s leading companies, governments, foundations, and nonprofits — and I know firsthand the power of the approach.” The scenario describes the connection between technology and development.

The following are 4 purely speculative scenarios - guesswork based on today´s scenario. Maybe Scenario 4 comes closest to today´s situation.

Introduction: Importantly, scenarios are not predictions. Rather, they are thoughtful hypotheses.

The Scenario Framework:  Predetermined elements are important to any scenario story, but they are not the foundation on which these stories are built.The scenarios that follow are not meant to be exhaustive — rather, they are designed to be both plausible and provocative. Each scenario tells a story of how the world, and in particular the developing world, might progress over the next 15 to 20 years.

I. LOCK STEP SCENARIO: A world of tighter top-down government control and more authoritarian leadership, with limited innovation and growing
citizen pushback

In 2012, the pandemic that the world had been anticipating for years finally hit. Unlike 2009’s H1N1, this new influenza strain — originating
from wild geese — was extremely virulent and deadly. Even the most pandemic-prepared nations were quickly overwhelmed when the virus streaked around the world, infecting nearly 20 percent of the global population and killing 8 million in just seven months, the majority of
them healthy young adults. The pandemic also had a deadly effect on economies: normally bustling shops and office buildings sat empty for months, devoid of both employees and customers. The pandemic blanketed the planet — though disproportionate numbers died in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Central America.

During the pandemic, national leaders around the world flexed their authority and imposed airtight rules and restrictions, from the mandatory wearing of face
masks to body-temperature checks at the entries to communal spaces like train stations and supermarkets. Even after the pandemic faded, this more authoritarian control and oversight of citizens and their activities stuck and even intensified. In order to protect themselves from the spread of increasingly global problems — from pandemics and transnational terrorism to environmental crises and rising poverty — leaders around the world took a firmer grip on power. At first, the notion of a more controlled world gained wide acceptance and approval. Citizens willingly gave up some of their sovereignty — and their privacy — to more paternalistic states in exchange for greater safety and stability. In developed countries, this heightened oversight took many forms: biometric IDs for all citizens, for example, and tighter regulation of key industries. Scientists and innovators were often told by governments what research lines to pursue and were guided mostly toward projects that would make money.

Wherever national interests clashed with individual interests, there was conflict. Sporadic pushback became increasingly organized and coordinated, as disaffected youth and people who had seen their status and opportunities slip away — largely in developing countries — incited civil unrest.Maldives

II. CLEVER TOGETHER: A world in which highly coordinated and successful strategies emerge for addressing both urgent and entrenched worldwide issues.
The recession of 2008-10 did not turn into the decades-long global economic slide that many had feared. In fact, quite the opposite: strong global growth returned in force, with the world headed once again toward the demographic and economic projections forecasted before the downturn.
Expansion largely ignored the very real environmental consequences of their unrestricted growth. Undeniably, the planet’s climate was becoming increasingly unstable.
Sea levels were rising fast
, even as countries continued to build-out coastal mega-cities (Agenda 21). That same year, new measurements showing that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels were climbing precipitously created new urgency and pressure for governments.
In 2015, a critical mass of middle income and developed countries with strong economic growth publicly committed to leveraging their resources against global-scale problems, beginning with climate change. Together, their governments hashed out plans for monitoring and reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the short term and improving the absorptive capacity of the natural environment over the long term. A functioning global cap and trade system was also established. New globally coordinated systems for monitoring energy use capacity were rolled out.

Inspired by the success of this experiment in collective global action, large-scale coordinated initiatives intensified. Centralized global oversight and governance structures sprang up, not just for energy use but also for disease and technology standards. Nation-states lost some of their power and importance as global architecture strengthened and regional governance structures emerged. International oversight entities like the UN took on new levels of authority, as did regional systems like the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), and the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The worldwide spirit of collaboration also fostered new alliances and alignments among corporations, NGOs, and communities. Coordinated efforts to tackle long-entrenched problems like hunger, disease, and access to basic needs took hold. These strong alliances laid the groundwork for more global and participatory attempts to solve big problems and raise the standard of living of everyone. Coordinated efforts to tackle long-entrenched problems like hunger, disease, and access to basic needs took hold.

In 2022, a consortium of nations, NGOs, and companies established the Global Technology Assessment Office, providing easily accessible, real-time information about the costs and benefits of various technology applications to developing and developed countries alike. All of these efforts translated into real progress on real problems. In many parts of the developing world, economic growth rates increased due to a host of factors. Improved infrastructure accelerated the greater mobility of both people and goods, and urban and rural areas got better connected. Much of the growth in the developing world was achieved more cleanly and more “greenly.” The Desertec initiative to create massive thermal electricity plants to supply both North Africa and, via undersea cable lines, Southern Europe was a huge success.

In Africa, political architecture above the nation-state level, like the African Union, strengthened and contributed to a “good governance” drive. Regional integration through COMESA (the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa) and other institutions allowed member nations to better organize to meet their collective needs as consumers and increasingly as producers. Over the course of two decades, enormous strides were made to make the world less wasteful, more efficient, and more inclusive.

The improved food distribution system, for example, generated a food production crisis due to greater demand. Indeed, demand for everything was growing exponentially. By 2028, despite ongoing efforts to guide “smart growth,” it was becoming clear that the world could not support such rapid
growth forever.

III. HACK ATTACK An economically unstable and shock-prone world in which governments weaken, criminals thrive, and dangerous innovations emerge Devastating.

The years 2010 to 2020 were dubbed the “doom decade” for good reason: the 2012 Olympic bombing, which killed 13,000, was followed closely by an earthquake in Indonesia killing 40,000, a tsunami that almost wiped out Nicaragua, and the onset of the West China Famine, caused by a once-in-a-millennium drought linked to climate change. In 2015, the U.S. reallocated a large share of its defense spending to domestic concerns, pulling out of Afghanistan — where the resurgent Taliban seized power once again. In Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa, more and more nation states lost control of their public finances, along with the capacity to help their citizens and retain stability and order. Resource scarcities and trade disputes, together with severe economic and climate stresses, pushed many alliances and partnerships to the breaking point; they also sparked proxy wars and low-level conflict in resource-rich parts of the developing world. Nations raised trade barriers in order to protect their domestic sectors against imports and — in the face of global food and resource shortages — to reduce exports of agricultural produce and other commodities. By 2016, the global coordination and interconnectedness that had marked the post-Berlin Wall world was tenuous at best. With government power weakened, order rapidly disintegrating, and safety nets evaporating, violence and crime grew more rampant.
Countries with ethnic, religious, or class divisions saw especially sharp spikes in hostility. Meanwhile, overtaxed militaries and police forces could do little to stop growing communities of criminals and terrorists from gaining power.

Parents not just in Africa but elsewhere began to avoid vaccinating their children, and it wasn’t long before infant and child mortality rates rose to levels not seen since the 1970s. Interestingly, not all of the “hacking” was bad. Genetically modified crops (GMOs) and do-it-yourself (DIY) biotech became backyard and garage activities, producing important advances. In 2017, a network of renegade African scientists who had returned to their home countries after working in Western multinationals unveiled the first of a range of new GMOs that boosted agricultural productivity on the continent.
Those who couldn’t buy their way out of chaos — which was most people — retreated to whatever “safety” they could find. With opportunity frozen and global mobility at a near standstill — no place wanted more people, especially more poor people — it was often a retreat to the familiar: family ties, religious beliefs, or even national allegiance. Trust was afforded to those who guaranteed safety and survival — whether it was a warlord, an evangelical preacher, or a mother. In some places, the collapse of state capacity led to a resurgence of feudalism. By 2030, the distinction between “developed” and “developing” nations no longer seemed particularly descriptive or relevant.

IV SMART SCRAMBLE: An economically depressed world in which individuals and communities develop localized, makeshift solutions to a growing set of problems.
The global recession that started in 2008 did not trail off in 2010 but dragged onward. Vigorous attempts to jumpstart markets and economies didn’t work, or at least not fast enough to reverse the steady downward pull.

except in the gravest humanitarian emergencies stability grew more precarious.

Not that anyone had time to think about the future — present challenges were too pressing. In the developed world, unemployment rates skyrocketed. So did xenophobia, as companies and industries gave the few available jobs to native-born citizens, shunning foreign-born applicants. Great numbers of immigrants who had resettled in the developed world suddenly found that the economic opportunities that had drawn them were now paltry at best. By 2018, London had been drained of immigrants, as they headed back to their home countries, taking their education and skills with them. Reverse migration left holes in the communities of departure — both socially and literally — as stores formerly owned by immigrants stood empty. And their homelands needed them. Across the developing world and especially in Africa, economic survival was now firmly in local hands.